Singapore’s sustainable packaging mandate is coming

by Rich Lindgren CPP, Chainalytics | Contributing Editor | January 14, 2017 It makes all the sense in the world to get out in front...

by Rich Lindgren CPP, Chainalytics | Contributing Editor | January 14, 2017

It makes all the sense in the world to get out in front of this impending regulation rather than scrambling to catch up with it after implementation has begun.

Sustainability has long been a concern to packaging professionals, but the reality for most manufacturers is that it is extremely difficult to make a case to use recyclable or returnable materials unless those measures are accompanied by significant boosts to profits or other efficiencies that justify the extra expenses associated with them. Transitioning to more sustainable packaging often includes using more expensive raw materials, changing processes, or employing reverse logistics for returnable packaging. Marketing departments are also often steadfast in their desires for eye-catching primary packaging, which generally requires additional layers that inhibit sustainability. The true bottom line is that perspectives on sustainability among stakeholders are fundamentally at odds. Governments and consumers want to maximize the use of recyclable or reusable materials, while manufacturers need cost-effective packaging and are usually resistant to passing the cost of increased sustainability down the supply chain. That is why the best way to make a business case for sustainable packaging is to create it in a way that ensures costs savings—a task that can be difficult, or even impossible, for many companies. [Full Story]  

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